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20121202
20121210
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
the fiscal cliff has all americans worried. after meeting with president obama this week with his fellow governors, my next guest says a failure to reach a solution would send his state into a recession. joining me now is utah governor gary herbert, a member of the national governors association executive committee. governor, welcome. >> thank you. it's an honor to be with you. >> i'm so glad you're here. i want to get your thoughts from inside the room there in person. did president obama make the case for his plan differently than he's been making it publicly? >> well, i think he knew that we were a bipartisan group. we had republicans and democrat governors there. did not expect us to come out and support one plan or the other, which we said going in we would not do. but we were grateful that he actually asked for our advice and our input. states and governors too often have been ignored, have been kind of an afterthought. and frankly we think that if congress and washington would look to the states and the governors they would develop better policy. so we were honored to be there to
the gop to negotiate, obama ends giving in. and peter baker writes that president obama has emerged kind of a different style of negotiator in the past week or two, sticking to the liberal line, frustrating the republicans clearly. this is a strategy his base might like but i'm wondering will it make him a better deal maker? >> it just may mean that republicans ultimately give him close to what he wants on raising tax rates on the top 2%. president obama has been very clear, he was all the way through the campaign that he would not give in on that. so that's i think what's important now. republicans don't like a lot of what was in the white house's opening offer. they dictate the $50 billion stimulus that was in the offer as a slap in the face. some of these little things we'll see taken out of file deal. >> to that point here's john boehner talking about when he saw that opening offer. >> i was flabbergasted. i looked at him and said you can't be serious. i just never seen anything like it. you know, we got seven weeks between election day and the end the year. and three of those weeks
and obama are still there. there are times the though even this week that it will get frustrated and stop talking to each other. i'm not sure if they're talking today or taking the day off. obama said yesterday that this could get done in about a week. i think he might be right. republicans see the writing on the wall when it comes to tax increases. what they're interested in now is making sure they get spending cuts to go along with the tax increases. when obama put his additional offer, he said $1.60 trillion in tax increases and we will delay the spending cuts until next year. that was the initial offer. republicans want to make sure that the spending cuts go up and become more immediate. considering that obama has been open to spending cuts in previous negotiations and says he is open to it now and republicans have changed from where they were a year ago when it comes to tax increases, i think it will not take too much to get their, although there are still obstacles. host: the $1.60 trillion and $800 billion are the opening numbers. where are we with those numbers now. have those num
for generations to come, it's going to be difficult for me to oppose higher rates for the rich." president obama and speaker boehner spoke by phone yesterday for the first time in a week. white house press secretary jay carney i find very interesting refused to characterize the conversation. let's bring in congressman chris van hollen of maryland tonight. good to have you with us. >> always good to when with you. >> you bet. are democrats united on this rate issue? we keep hearing it. now that boehner is starting to move a little bit and say that the money is going to come from the wealthy, yet he hasn't identified these reductions, where do democrats stand on rates? is that the bottom line? the rates have to go up? >> the rates have to two up, ed. it's a matter of simple math, as the president has said. which is why in the house of representatives the democrats filed what's called a discharge petition that would require the speaker to bring to the floor of the house the senate bill, the senate democratic bill that immediately would extend tax relief to all middle income taxpayers and would ask
republicans that president obama and democrats actually wanted to avoid it. that was the premise that any possible agreement had shown. that was the common goal, or so we thought. over the past couple of weeks it's become increasingly clear to many of us that we were simply wrong about that. incredibly, many top democrats, including the president, seemed perfectly happy -- perfectly happy -- to go off the cliff. that's why the president has been more interested in campaign rallies than actually negotiating a deal. and it explains why the president is now stubbornly insisting on raising tax rates when he himself said just last year that you could raise more revenue from capping deductions and closing loopholes. this isn't about the deficit for them or balance. it's about an ideological campaign that most americans thought would have ended on november 6, and that's also why the president sent secretary geithner up here last week with a proposal so completely ridiculous it wouldn't have passed the house, as i indicated earlier, if nancy pelosi were still speaker. it was more of a provocation
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)